January 14, 2015 | by John Squires | in Commentary

What Can Be Learned From UMass Amherst’s Decision To Select Amazon

This week, the University of Massachusetts’ flagship Amherst campus selected Amazon to provide textbooks and other course materials for students beginning this fall.

This is a bold move from a major university. It recognizes that textbooks are a major and increasing expense for students, adding to the already growing problem of student debt. If these rising costs are not quickly addressed this will ultimately have a material impact on student performance and retention.

It also recognizes today’s students demand for transparency, value and convenience with everything they purchase. They want to know that they are buying the right product, at the right price, and want to place their order quickly, across any device, at any time.
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June 25, 2014 | by John Squires | in Webinars & Events, Commentary

Lower the Cost of College Operations: Ideas on Preparing for Digital Textbook Delivery

The higher education conference season is in full effect. I attended an ed tech conference called UBTech held by University Business magazine earlier this month in Orlando, Florida. This was my first time attending UBTech, having formerly mainly focused on the CampusTech conference.

UBTech had a good mix of college and university Chief Technology Officers, Chief Information Officers, Chief Financial Officers, and similar roles. It also attracted ed tech companies, textbook publishers, bookstore services providers, and other organizations in the industry.

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April 30, 2013 | by John Squires | in Commentary

Should College Bookstores Continue To Sell Books?

You may have seen the recent post on the Akademos blog summarizing outcomes from our survey of college and university CFOs about textbook trends and bookstore services practices. Many of our findings were not a surprise — such as the idea that students are leaving the college bookstore to shop at third-party retailers because of perceived better pricing. Others were a bit confounding — like the desire to offer students lower-cost textbooks, while simultaneously hesitating to sell textbooks from anywhere but brick-and-mortar college bookstores.

As college administrators search for the right direction regarding bookstore operations, I think lessons from changes in the trade bookstore business are worth considering in this discussion of how college bookstores may evolve. Today’s trade book consumer is fiercely value-conscious, and the brick-and-mortar bookstore business has been revolutionized by the selection, price, and speed of delivery offered by online retailers. Local bookstores that have survived have done so by offering unique services and products not readily available from online sellers.

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January 30, 2013 | by John Squires | in Textbook Affordability, Commentary

Welcome to Textbook Affordability Month

 

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September 24, 2012 | by Brian Jacobs | in Commentary

The eTextbook Bust

The final report on a major digital textbook pilot appeared recently and, because I wanted to study the document closely, mark it up with scribble unintelligible to anyone but its author, I immediately printed it out. And as I did that, I felt strangely self-conscious of the act, as if I were prejudicing the report's conclusions before turning a page.

The pilot, which took place in the spring of this year and included Cornell, Indiana University at Bloomington, and the Universities of Minnesota, Virginia, and Wisconsin at Madison, was pretty close to a complete failure. Certainly there are nuggets of encouragement but these were far outnumbered by student criticisms. One could almost sense the report’s authors straining to put the best face on the results. It’s admirable that they did not flinch from conveying students’ frustrations and disappointments with the reading materials, but the results really were worse than their concluding comments suggest.

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September 21, 2012 | by John Squires | in Commentary

The Battle for Higher Ed's Future: Wall Streeters v. Academics (Point, Academics)

Torn down the middle. That's how the NY Times Magazine's September Education Issue portrayed UVA's campus on its cover page, along with a dramatic title: Anatomy of a Campus Coup: The inside story of the failed ouster of the University of Virginia's president--and what it means for the future of higher education.

By now, many of us know the story of UVA president Teresa Sullivan's forced resignation and subsequent reinstatement. In fact, it took me a few days to read the Times Magazine cover story because, well, I thought I already knew what had happened. It turns out there was still more to the soap opera, and a little bit of journalistic digging has helped uncover some lessons learned and a conspiracy theory or two. Allow me to summarize the article for you...

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